Design icon: Cornishware

First manufactured in the 1920s by T.G. Green & Co. in Church Gresley, Derbyshire - the home of the famous Mason Cash mixing bowl also - Cornishware has adorned millions of British homes and has become a design classic. cornishware cornish blue

cornishware cornish blue

The range’s special characteristic came from the lathe-turning process, which cut clean bands through its beautiful blue slip to show the white clay beneath. It was apparently this that inspired the name, since it reminded one T.G.Green & Co. employee of the clear blues and white-tipped waves of Cornwall.

In the 1960s, it was updated by a young designer called Judith Onions. It says much for her skill and sensitivity that this restyled range was embraced as warmly as the originals had been.

Then, despite continuing popularity, the factory closed in 2007, the less said about that the better, and supplies became scarce. Lifelong admirers Charles Rickards and Paul Burston, teamed up with designer and branding advisor Perry Haydn Taylor, whose wife Vik is an enthusiastic Cornishware collector, to come to the rescue - hurrah to them.

cornishware cornish blue

cornishware cornish blue

"It was very sad what happened to the company – but recent times have been tough for the industry as a whole. You only have to look at what has happened in the potteries to realise that, but I'm so pleased that Cornishware is back and I'm really looking to moving forward with the new owners" said Paul Burston at the opening in Derbyshire.

"We feel so privileged to be able to revive this design classic. The ranges are currently being manufactured abroad, but we have plans to restore a manageable level of production in Derbyshire later this year" added Charles Rickards.

"These products are part of the British way of life. To let them vanish would simply have been irresponsible." We agree with you Perry Haydn Taylor. Thank you all for saving this iconic brand.

cornishware cornish blue

cornishware cornish blue

cornishware cornish blue