How to care for your leather sofa - 4 easy tips

Dramatic-living-room-modern-Livingetc

A leather suite may be the focal point in your living room but an ugly stain can make it more of a problem than a feature. Just incorporate these basic elements into your cleaning routine and you can enjoy your leather sofa for many years to come.

Dramatic-living-room-modern-Livingetc

 1. Keep it cool

Bright sunlight can dry up the natural oils in leather and cause it to fade, dry and crack. If your leather sofa is near a window, consider using window blinds or covering the leather in a throw to protect it from harsh UV damage.

Brick-and-Wood-sitting-room-Livingetc-Housetohome

 2. Keep it moisturised

Leather is very similar to your skin in that it needs the right kind of moisturiser to keep it looking healthy. A simple home treatment is to mix one part white vinegar and two parts linseed oil and apply on the surface of your sofa. Make sure the mixture is completely absorbed before buffing with a soft cloth to get the leather nice and shiny.

Quirky-modern-living-room

 3. Remove stains

If a coffee stain on your cream coloured leather sofa is the stuff of nightmares, just remember that it is actually possible to treat leather stains. Saddle soap can work wonders on leather stains and also softens the surface. Try using it with a soft cloth on your settee once a week.

You could also use a damp cloth with a mild soap for lighter stains. Just make sure that you wipe away the lather and check that the cloth is not too wet to avoid water marks. Once the leather has been cleaned, don’t forget to apply a leather conditioner to lock in the moisture.

Striped-living-room

 4.  Banish smells

Leather can trap strong smells like tobacco smoke and pet odours. You can treat these however with a range of options. A flannel cloth with a bit of baby oil can help make it smell nice and look after the leather as well. There’s also a range of professional cleaning products available that can tackle the toughest of smells. Just make sure that you do a spot test on a small patch of leather first to check that it doesn’t react to the chemicals.

If you’re thinking of upgrading your leather sofa, take look at these options from The Range.

Images via House to Home.