In The Diary: The Tragedy of Landscape Exhibition

The Tragedy of Landscape is a new exhibition curated by Antlers for Griffin Gallery, London.

The exhibition brings together six contemporary artists that re-approach notions of the Romantic Landscape within their practice. The show takes its name from a comment on the work of Caspar David Friedrich by David d’Angers:

“Friedrich! … The only landscape painter so far to succeed in stirring up all the forces of my soul, the painter who has created a new genre: the tragedy of the landscape.”

Anouk Mercier, And the Ruin was Finally Revealed 

Anouk Mercier, And the Ruin was Finally Revealed 

The exhibiting artists share a common interest in the landscape genre and – in their own way – all act to subvert our perceived notions of it. We are invited to look at what lurks behind the idylls that we are presented with and think beyond the anaesthetised, beatified view of the natural world; works that appeal to our notions of beauty will often allude to something more sinister when enquired upon further.

Wieland Payer, Game, 2014, pastel charcoal on paper on board, 30 x 45 cm

Wieland Payer, Game, 2014, pastel charcoal on paper on board, 30 x 45 cm

Many of the artists work directly with historical paintings and etchings, reworking them into new imagery in order to play on the fabricated, fictional nature of the original works and promote the fantastical.

Reece Jones, Multiplex

Reece Jones, Multiplex

Others use the Romantic Landscape as a motif – a departure point to re-examine our relationship with the natural world. Seeing their 17th / 18th Century counterparts as the first ecological movement and exploring how this is updated in a world where the idea of the sublime is as easily related to the onslaught of technology, as it is a mountain or waterfall.

Geoff Diego Litherland, SpaceShipEarth-Accept-what-You-Destroy

Geoff Diego Litherland, SpaceShipEarth-Accept-what-You-Destroy

Preview: Wednesday 11th February 6-9pm Exhibition Open: 12th February – 13th March 2015 Griffin Gallery, The Studio Building, 21 Evesham Street, London, W11 4AJ